Today myself, Rahul,Rage, Zoe and Rachael finally got to visit the Dickens house in broad stairs so that we could understand our brief more. It was amazing and very interesting. This nice man took us around and showed us all the important key things that we needed to know, this man was very helpful and very knowledgable. Je made it fun and exciting to be there. We all listened carefully to all the history that he was telling us and we took notes, Here are all the notes that we wrote up, we have put all our notes together which will helped us greatly:

  • Charles Dickens was born on 7th February 1812
  • He got married on 2nd April 1836
  • Wrote over 15,00 letters
  • Wife Kathleen / Kate
  • His father’s debt was around £50
  • Annual salary around then times were £20
  • The Dickens fellowship was founded in 1902

The authorised Dickens plates

  • The plates celebrate 100 years when Dickens died
  • Costed £30 in 1970

Side Board

  • Bought this side board 14 days before his marriage
  • The product was second-hand

Travelling Writing Slope

  • Dickens used this on his 2nd great tour of America

Absolute versions / First editions

  • Dickens first had absolute versions of his books which were slimmer
  • Then came the first editions which Dickens serialised so people couldn’t buy them
  • People couldn’t afford books in them times

Dickens owned 50 items

Some of the items were;

  • Pens
  • Keys
  • Purses
  • Stamp blocks
  • Pen wiper
  • Fan

Items in the museum

  • 2 pairs white child wedding shoes
  • Purple silk mourning dress
  • Old umbrella parasols

1836 14 days before he got marred 2rd april 1836 he got married, the house was once the home of Miss Mary.

Writing slope 1868 2 years before he died

1st edition 1836 contact story 3 chapters 2 illustrations the price was a shilling

Dickens used real people as Nicholas Nicole’s his mum couldn’t make a cup of tea if she could try, his father was always in debt he wrote 2 books never 1, when dickens became famous his father would go to the shop and say send the bill to Charles dickens.

John dickens would write letter which wasn’t important but Charles dickens still replied back to him, because it had Charles Dickens signature on the letter john dickens would try to sell the letter.

Dickens employed an illustrator 2 years younger than him harbet knight brown was his name he then changed his name to fizz ( 1st edition of copper field)

Items in the Charles dickens museum

The Birmingham mint Christmas plate 1974, food cloth five plates made in Britannia metal an alloy tin

The buildings he used in his storied freemas court, cornhill, London Dodson and fogg the rascally lawyers in pickwick had their offices here, in the ground floor front of a dingy house at the very farthest end… the clerks cathing as favourable glimpses of heaven light and heavens sun in the course of their daily labours as a man might hope to do… at the bottom of a reasonably deep well.

In 1851 he wrote ‘Our English watering place’ so many children are brought down to our watering-place that when they are not out of doors, as they usually are in fire weather, it is wonderful where they are put: the whole village seeming much to small to hold them under cover In the afternoon you see no end of salt and sandy little boots drying on upper windows sills.

This display is set out as a nursery on items on display include: airing rack with various baby clothes, a copper warming pan moses basket with babies caps, a nursing chair with a silk carrying cape, a cherry red merino wool boys dress a pin cushion layette two dolls and various dolls clothes a baby crib draped with a white christening grown over the end a baby walker and a late 18th century babies chair.

We also got a few leaflets to help us with our brief/assignment:

 

We noticed that there was a colour scheme in the museum, we looked deeply into this as we knew that this was something to think about whilst creating our brochure, here is the colour scheme that was inside the dickens house:

  • Plum red
  • Cream
  • Green
  • Brown
  • White

 

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